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Thread: button shifters

  1. #1
    I have been having troubles finding appropriate buttons for the shifter for our car. I'm looking for Momentary on buttons with a positive feel and about 3/4 inch in diameter.

    Any suggestions on where to find them?
    Sean
    University of Guelph

    Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.
    Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi

  2. #2
    Originally posted by Pico:
    I have been having troubles finding appropriate buttons for the shifter for our car. I'm looking for Momentary on buttons with a positive feel and about 3/4 inch in diameter.

    Any suggestions on where to find them?
    You'll have to be more specific about "momentary on buttons"...

    What is your setup consisting of? Are you just taking the signal right from the button without cleaning it up first? Where is the signal going after it 'leaves' the button....

    More info = more answers
    UNB FSAE - Weally, weally fast !!!

  3. #3
    sorry about the lack of info...

    The setup is controlled by a microcontroller. Basically the button has a voltage that, when pressed, is grounded (pull down setup). The microcontroller detects this and does the shifting.
    So the button doesn't see a large amperage.
    Sean
    University of Guelph

    Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.
    Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi

  4. #4
    how is the button activated.... i mean radioshack sells almost exactly what you describe....

  5. #5
    push button
    Sean
    University of Guelph

    Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.
    Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi

  6. #6
    We use a power window button from some ford vehicle and it is quite nice since it has an up and down rocker action which is perfect for shifting. It is a momentary contact switch with a nice click to it.
    Devin Weston
    Oregon State FSAE
    Engine Team '04-'06

  7. #7
    Originally posted by Pico:
    sorry about the lack of info...

    The setup is controlled by a microcontroller. Basically the button has a voltage that, when pressed, is grounded (pull down setup). The microcontroller detects this and does the shifting.
    So the button doesn't see a large amperage.
    Sounds pretty resonable.

    check www.digikey.com, whttp://www.goldmine-elec.com/default.htm, ebay, etc... you will find something.

    Or like the other guys said, junkyard

    words to search for, push button, press button, tactile switch ...etc..

    Also, don't foget to debounce your signal, but I'm sure you've already done that.
    UNB FSAE - Weally, weally fast !!!

  8. #8
    try push button switches from
    ITW switches. they are about the
    nicest push button around IMHO for this
    application.

    http://www.itwswitches.com/newsite/p...pushbutton.htm

    We've used the series 59 for push button shifters, and starter buttons.

    IP67 Waterproof, tactile feel, really nice.
    rated for about 1 million operations.
    UNM FSAE 2003 to 2005

  9. #9
    those look rediculousy over priced ... can you tell me how much you paid for them? How exactly do the hall effect sensors work in the button? That's kind of confusing me...

    Originally posted by Chris Boyden:
    try push button switches from
    ITW switches. they are about the
    nicest push button around IMHO for this
    application.

    http://www.itwswitches.com/newsite/p...pushbutton.htm

    We've used the series 59 for push button shifters, and starter buttons.

    IP67 Waterproof, tactile feel, really nice.
    rated for about 1 million operations.
    UNB FSAE - Weally, weally fast !!!

  10. #10
    Hey man, you get what you pay for. Did you
    even bother to price them out??
    But, if you are worried about cost
    try the sample button. And if you're that
    worried about cost, why are you
    doing push button shifting?
    What's all this talk about hall effect sensors?
    I think you're looking at the wrong datasheet.
    series 59 is what we used.
    you were looking at 49.
    On the plus side, hall effect switches probably don't need to be debounced, but code is cheap, and parts are not.
    UNM FSAE 2003 to 2005

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