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Thread: Recruiting

  1. #11
    Especially don't make them die grind aluminum.

    Wesley
    OU Sooner Racing Team Alum '09

    connecting-rods.blogspot.com

  2. #12
    It takes a special type of person to build these cars in one year, and even more to build them right. It's very difficult when there's a few people on the team who would do whatever it takes to get the car done, and the rest just don't have the same priorities. I think we all have similar stories and face similar situations. It will never be perfect. All we can do is try our best to build the teams and make small improvements each and every year.

    Restore an old formula car that's been lying in the basement of your engineering dept., come up with an interesting freshmen project, teach them everything you know. That's all we can do because eventually it will be their turn and we don't want what we built to go to waste.

    Aaron Cassebeer
    Lehigh FSAE('04-'07)
    Design Engineer, Scaled Composites

  3. #13
    UNH Precision Racing is in its 4th season. I have been a member of the program since the 2nd season. Recruitment has been something I have worked hard at to keep the program going. UNH Precision Racing is the single most important thing to me in school.

    To recruit members, we do the same stuff anyone else does...Display the car, attend all university acctivity fair days, etc. This season, we had about 50 kids show up wanting to 'build a racecar' before they knew the true meaning. Most of them were underlcassmen, the blood and future fo the program. Keeping them was crucial; I was aiming to keep 50% realistically.

    The trick here is to KEEP the members...Recruiting is easy when you have a racecar on display and promo videos. To KEEP the members, our 'super' seniors, who have an extra semester left, are 'Student Advisors' and get technical credit. They host seminars in the fall to bring the underclassmen up to speed on theory and fabrication experience. There were about 4 and they covered the basics from statics and frame design, to basic suspension geometry; i.e. what to do and what to avoid...

    This helps bring them into the program on a basic level, rather than slamming them with fluid dynamics and intake design.

    The next step is to get them in the shop. MAke them know they are needed and the car won't get done without their help. Whether it was sanding or making slugs. Make sure you tell them they are needed, because THEY ARE!

    Final step. Keep it fun. When it comes down to it, ya the seniors need to man up and get it done with or without the underclassmen. So keep them involved by keeping it fun. Whether its playing GTR-2 during down time or going karting and teaching the basics of navigating a race track, its fun, and its beneficial for the program in all aspects.



    Side note: Lap times in GTR-2 get better after an average of 2-3 beers, but begin to get worse after approx. 4.

    Ok, time to get back in the shop and get this thing built. Good luck.
    B. Bell
    UNH Precision Racing
    www.unh.edu/fsae

  4. #14
    Note: Our 'super seniors' were 4th year seniors the previous year when they were on the team. As Student Advisors they have to write a large, indepth research paper on a specific aspect of the car. This is the primary reason for their credit.
    B. Bell
    UNH Precision Racing
    www.unh.edu/fsae

  5. #15
    We have lots of people show up at the driver's meetings, and some at the general meetings, but only 5 or so that ever do real work.(everyone wants to drive, no one wants to build)
    I'm one of two who built the chassis. Next year I am suppost to carry it on. As a non engineering major, its something I probably won't do for a few reasons. The main reason is that disagreements on the team are never compromises and always end in someone thinking their manhood is being challenged.

  6. #16
    Tony,

    Trust me, what you are going through is nothing new. I think a lot of teams will report loosing members as it gets closer to competition.

    You can try announcing incentives (free food?) at the general meeting so people show up to work on the weekends. This will also bring people to the shop for free food, and then they will leave.

    Most new members have generally stopped coming because they didn't have anything to do. They stood around for a while during the fall semester and then just stopped coming.

    You're problem is NOT finding quality members, it's that you haven't spent time TRAINING quality members. There are very few students that come to college that can perform any type of design or fabrication, and less that can do quality design or fabrication.

    It's hard to say why older members stop coming. They need to study more? Could also be "all work and no play" sucks. Everyone needs to find their balance. How much school work they can handle. How much FSAE they can handle. How much other fun they can miss.

    The best way to keep members is to have a mentoring program. One on one. Current member works with a new member. It's hard work, but that's what it's going to take.

    Here are a few of the past posts:

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/1...2406044402/p/1

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/24060444...676055402#7676055402

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/14310959...10089511#70410089511

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/25810897...10599131#70710599131

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/58260153...076073485#2076073485
    Dan De Clute-Melancon
    Iowa State FSAE alumni
    Project Manager 03-04
    Engine Team Leader 02-03

  7. #17
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mechanicaldan:
    Tony,

    Trust me, what you are going through is nothing new. I think a lot of teams will report loosing members as it gets closer to competition.

    You can try announcing incentives (free food?) at the general meeting so people show up to work on the weekends. This will also bring people to the shop for free food, and then they will leave.

    Most new members have generally stopped coming because they didn't have anything to do. They stood around for a while during the fall semester and then just stopped coming.

    You're problem is NOT finding quality members, it's that you haven't spent time TRAINING quality members. There are very few students that come to college that can perform any type of design or fabrication, and less that can do quality design or fabrication.

    It's hard to say why older members stop coming. They need to study more? Could also be "all work and no play" sucks. Everyone needs to find their balance. How much school work they can handle. How much FSAE they can handle. How much other fun they can miss.

    The best way to keep members is to have a mentoring program. One on one. Current member works with a new member. It's hard work, but that's what it's going to take.

    Here are a few of the past posts:

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/1...2406044402/p/1

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/24060444...676055402#7676055402

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/14310959...10089511#70410089511

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/25810897...10599131#70710599131

    http://fsae.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/125607348/m/58260153...076073485#2076073485 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Not to rant, but I remember in my first two years of ISU FSAE, I had only a few parts go on the car - A carbon fiber radiator shroud and a few chassis tubes and mounting tabs and brackets. Most of these two first years were spent doing the "bitch" work of the team - taking out the trash, sanding, and grinding chassis tubes. I also watched the other leaders machine, weld, and assemble various components. I knew if I kept coming to meetings and shop days that I would eventually get more meaningful work. In the past, I also watched a lot of leaders, namely Jason and Jim, scare away alot of new members, but I decided to put up with their criticism.

    I might sound like an old man, but alot of the new guys that come in here don't know the vaule of a hard day's work. They come in, tell you you should turbo the car, put NOS in it, and tell you that they could build a better car themselves. We've had a few new guys that knew their shit and rose to the top quickly. They are the ones now building the car. But, most of them don't know their shit, and don't think they need training on a lathe or welder. When told to sand or grind, they think they are above that "bitch work" and leave. In my mind, the new guys should have to put up with the same level of "bitch" work that I did and work their way up, but that hasn't obviously worked out for us.

    After reading all these posts, I have thought of a possible new position - New Member Coordinator. The leaders could train this person in all aspects of fabrication and design, then this person could pass this knowledge down to the new members. Our problem is right now, we honestly don't have the time to train new members, which in turn, screws us over even more in the future. This new position could allow the leaders to go about their work while engaging new members at the same time.

    I have also thought of conducting an interview process and tryouts for new recruits. Over the past few years, our team has built up a very high level of prestige on campus, and I think we could use this prestige to our advantage. Make every new member go through basic shop and saftey training. Give them a few small projects, like repairing systems on an old FSAE car. The ones that show up every weekend and show a geninue interest in the car are the ones we will focus more training and support on, the ones who only show up occasionaly, get cut. This way, leaders can focus training efforts on people who are going to stay, rather than spreading out their training efforts on 50 different people.

    As a side note, another interesting trend i've seen with some of the new members is outright lying on resumes about FSAE positions. I've seen random people claim they were Project Directors, Engine Team Leaders, etc. Of course, this bites them in the ass when I get a phone call from the Caterpillars, the Mercurys, and the Hondas asking about their ficticous positions. These guys are just asking to get blacklisted from an entire industry. Have any of you guys seen this? Its a pretty interesting trend...
    Tony Sartor
    05'-07' Project Director/Baja Team Motivator
    Iowa State Formula SAE

    "Nothing that was good went into that car!"

  8. #18
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by afroney:
    Question for every team:

    How do you guys find quality people?

    ISU FSAE has been in a slump with membership. Its pretty much down to 5 people that actually build the car, and 2 people who spend more than 20hrs/week in the shop.

    Our problem is finding quality members. Every year, we have 50 people that show up, and most of them leave. I would say that the problem is that 95 percent of the incoming engineers at ISU are either too stupid or lazy to contribute to the team. It sounds harsh, but its the truth. Trouble is finding the 5%. It seems that Iowa State University is lacking quality people nowadays...

    How do you guys keep recruit/retain members? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Hah - you think you're in a bad spot? Wichita State has about 6-7 hard workers in both Baja and FSAE. A few of us are also wanting to go to both Baja SAE Rochester and FSAE West - we're still trying to figure out how to do that!

  9. #19
    Ask H. G. Wells
    Campus policies left students shooting back with camera phones. Life's worth more than pictures.
    www.ConcealedCampus.com

  10. #20
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Azim:
    Hah - you think you're in a bad spot? Wichita State has about 6-7 hard workers in both Baja and FSAE. A few of us are also wanting to go to both Baja SAE Rochester and FSAE West - we're still trying to figure out how to do that! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Hah! You think you've got it bad?? Between the Clean Snowmobile, Mini Baja and FSAE, we have 4 productive people! 2 on CSC, 1 on Baja, and 2 for FSAE. You might notice that adds to 5... Thats because I'm one of the 2 on both CSC and FSAE

    Good grief....12 days to CSC competition, and 72 days to FSAE...
    Kettering University FSAE Alumni

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