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Thread: Goodyear Tire Sale

  1. #1

    Goodyear Tire Sale

    Goodyear is proud to announce that for the months of September 2018 and February 2019, our D2704 dry tire and D2703 rain tire can be purchased buy 3 get 1 free. Go to https://www.racegoodyear.com/tires/fsae.html for more information about Goodyear tires. If you have any questions or would like to purchase tires, please contact your regionís Goodyear distributor which can be found here: http://www.racegoodyear.com/distributors.html. If you are located outside the United States or Canada, please contact Jay Chapman at jaychapman@goodyear.com.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    In God we trust, everybody else bring data.

    I would hope that some usable force & moment data would accompany the purchase of these tires. Would make a handy comparison to the TIRF equivalent.

  3. #3
    Bill - IIRC these tires have data available from the SAE TTC.
    Jay Swift
    Combustion Powertrain
    Global Formula Racing 2013-2014

  4. #4
    Jay is correct. We will also have our dry tire included in the upcoming round of TTC testing.

  5. #5
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    No kidding ?

    Well of course there is/will be TTC tested data. I'd also want the see the results that GOODYEAR has produced on THEIR OWN machinery back in Ohio or Luxemburg or Terra Del Fuego, etc.

    This would help establish some "round-robin" comparison metrics for simulationists to explore. Even if GDY were to say that they use TIRF, I'm pretty sure there would be different procedures, configurations, surface prep, break-in, conditioning and data extraction processes than have been used in TTC Rounds. They didn't just slap some polymers, cord, and white paint onto a drum and squirt out a tire construction. It's more likely that these tires were developed by an iterative process with careful attention to grip, symmetry, stiffnesses and durability.

    Just wondering. It may be that their data collection and evaluation processes are proprietary, but I often worked on the harmonization of tire construction evaluations among companies and GM. This helps the end product selection process immensely. (That's a lot of process processing).

    A long shot, but it would help with model validation confidence.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by BillCobb View Post
    Well of course there is/will be TTC tested data. I'd also want the see the results that GOODYEAR has produced on THEIR OWN machinery back in Ohio or Luxemburg or Terra Del Fuego, etc.

    This would help establish some "round-robin" comparison metrics for simulationists to explore. Even if GDY were to say that they use TIRF, I'm pretty sure there would be different procedures, configurations, surface prep, break-in, conditioning and data extraction processes than have been used in TTC Rounds. They didn't just slap some polymers, cord, and white paint onto a drum and squirt out a tire construction. It's more likely that these tires were developed by an iterative process with careful attention to grip, symmetry, stiffnesses and durability.

    Just wondering. It may be that their data collection and evaluation processes are proprietary, but I often worked on the harmonization of tire construction evaluations among companies and GM. This helps the end product selection process immensely. (That's a lot of process processing).

    A long shot, but it would help with model validation confidence.
    Bill, unless a team has done something on their own, the only physical F&M data that exists on these tires was collected at TIRF by the FSAE TTC. We certainly did a lot of modeling and lab testing as a part of this tire development project but most of that data is stuff that will help a tire supplier figure out how to make their design better and not stuff that would help teams with tire selection or vehicle setup. As I know you're well aware, F&M data is far from perfect and the tests are expensive to run. We opted to use a combination of inexpensive lab tests, subjective feedback, and objective vehicle level measurements to sort through relatively coarse design decisions. What was kind of fun about FSAE tire development was being able to write a spec in the office, build a set of four downstairs, and then run them across the street to get near instant feedback on your ideas.

  7. #7
    Zac,

    Is there any possibility that the D2697 would ever be produced again? If I remember correctly, that tire was axed because it was not REACH compliant and therefore could not be sold in Europe. But it doesn't appear that the D2704 is even being sold in Europe anyways (I could be mistaken). So why not bring the D2697 back into production?

    I know the cars have changed quite a bit since that tire existed back in 2012, but when we spent a weekend testing 5+ different tires from multiple manufactures (there were at least 3 goodyear D-codes in there) the D2697 out performed everything else hands down.

    Just wanted to pitch the idea out there.. The last time I discussed fsae tires with any one from goodyear, it seemed that a lot of people didn't even know that D-code ever existed or had forgotten that it ever existed (I think only about 15 sets were ever produced).
    Last edited by MegaDeath; 10-09-2018 at 09:53 PM.
    ___________________________

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  8. #8
    If I remember correctly I think the D2697 was a casualty of a directive to make most of the sportscar line REACH compliant. As far as I know that directive is still in place and the FSAE stuff is still available from Karl-Heinz Tibor/Goodyear Motorsport Europe but I'm a couple steps removed from the race distribution system. Jay Chapman would be a much better contact on that end.

    but the D2704 is really just a minor tweak from the D2697 to make the tread cap compliant. We didn't see significant performance differences in our testing. YMMV. One thing I'm relatively sure of though, if we come out with a new tire, it'll be a new tire and not something we had released previously.

    for those interested here are the cliff notes on the various released Goodyear FSAE tire codes. A lot of these have been tested by the TTC so you should be able to use that data to get an idea of what physical changes to a tire design influence what F&M characteristics. It's good knowledge to have if you ever find yourself working at a tire supplier or in a tire wheel systems group at an OEM.

    D2692 - This was the original dry tire. This was the first tire to come out of the dedicated FSAE mold. Anything we provided to schools before this was re-purposed from some other type of Formula car, probably a Formula Ford or similar nonsense.

    D2691 - This was the same construction as the D2692 but with an old F1 rain tread compound (R065). It'd light off fast for an autocross lap but it would degrade pretty badly over the course of a dry endurance run.

    D2696 - This was a compound only change to the same construction. We ended up with a stiffer compound that also had more grip.

    D2697 - This was an all new construction that upped the grip and response level from the D2696. Same tread cap (I think) and mold as previous though.

    D2704 - Current dry tire. As mentioned it's a small tweak from the D2697 to make it compliant with European import regulations.

    D2703 - Current rain tire. It's the same construction as D2704 but with the R065 rain compound.

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