+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: single nut locking torque

  1. #1

    single nut locking torque

    As of this year we're using 10 inch wheels (Keizer CL10) with single locking nut.
    We tried to calculate the needed locking torque that we need. We got approx. 160 Nm in the calculations.
    We used 180 Nm for safety factor.
    When we drive the car the single nut gets loose after around 20 minutes of driving.
    We tried to calculate again and again, still we got the same results.
    Is someone familiar with single lock nuts and willing to help us?
    If you use single lock nuts what is your locking torque?

    Thanks for the help,

    Boaz Cohen
    Head of power delivery team
    BGRacing
    Ben Gurion University
    Israel

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Brighton, MI
    Posts
    598

    Nut Case

    Maybe its not a nut problem but a hub, stud or bearing problem.

  3. #3
    You cannot look at the locking torque only. You need to "translate" that in pressure on the rim. What is the resulting axial force coming from the wheel torque To do that you need to take into account the pitch of the thread. A fine thread will have a different effect that a gross thread.

    The other issue is that you may need left hand or right hand thread depending the side of the car you are looking at. I let you guess why. You also need to look at the driving or braking torques that are not necessarily the same.
    Claude Rouelle
    OptimumG president
    Vehicle Dynamics & Race Car Engineering
    Training / Consulting / Simulation Software
    FS & FSAE design judge USA / Canada / UK / Germany / Spain / Italy / China / Brazil / Australia
    [url]www.optimumg.com[/u

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Buffalo, NY USA
    Posts
    266
    Quote Originally Posted by firstboaz View Post
    Is someone familiar with single lock nuts and willing to help us?
    There is a long thread (sorry for pun) on this topic --
    http://www.fsae.com/forums/showthrea...d-wheels/page9
    This link is in the middle of the discussion, where I think it gets interesting...but you may want to start at the beginning.

    There are probably other threads too, but this is the first good one my searching turned up.

  5. #5
    We had the same issue until we started using anti-seize on the threads. Use plenty of antiseize on the splines (if applicable), spindle, and the threads of the nut.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by maxhouck View Post
    We had the same issue until we started using anti-seize on the threads. Use plenty of antiseize on the splines (if applicable), spindle, and the threads of the nut.
    Wet Torque and Dry Torque are two different specifications. 180 NM WET will put substantially higher axial load on the threads than 180 DRY. If you aren't knowledgeable on this concept, you might one day wonder "why it broke".
    Buckingham

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts