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Thread: Positive locking for sphericals

  1. #1
    Hi everyone.

    We're having a few problems with our positive locking method for the spherical bearings this year. We have many options at our disposal, some simple, some not.

    I was wondering if any of you could help me out by telling me the method you use to lock your spherical bearings into the wishbones.

    It would help a great deal in our choices.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jon
    Jon O'Neill

    Advisor-UTS Motorsports, Sydney, Australia
    www.utsmotorsports.com

  2. #2
    Hi everyone.

    We're having a few problems with our positive locking method for the spherical bearings this year. We have many options at our disposal, some simple, some not.

    I was wondering if any of you could help me out by telling me the method you use to lock your spherical bearings into the wishbones.

    It would help a great deal in our choices.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jon
    Jon O'Neill

    Advisor-UTS Motorsports, Sydney, Australia
    www.utsmotorsports.com

  3. #3
    Staking sphericals works pretty well, it's certainly the lightest and probably easiest method, although you have to make sure you get your staking forces right or you can have them fall out and/or bind up. Apparently some manufacturers don't recommend staking (as we've found with some metric sphericals we've been trying to get), although I can't imagine why since that's surely how they're secured into rod ends.

    The down side is that generally once you've staked a spherical into a housing, that housing cannot be reused (unless you're a rough @#$%), so if it's welded to a wishbone then your wishbones become a replacement item
    Malcolm Graham
    University of Auckland '06-'09
    www.fsae.co.nz

  4. #4
    We've used circlips on our outboard wishbone sphericals for the last couple years, and a small steel cap on the inboards last year. Both worked well and were replaceable, but they're going to staked all round this year because of weight and rigidity. One problem we thought may affect our circlipped sphericals was possible deformation from welding, but it didn't seem to affect any of the housings.
    --------------------------------------------
    Technical Director UARC 2007

    http://formula-sae.adelaide.edu.au

  5. #5
    with the staking, make sure you make your holes are to the manufacturers spec, especially the chamfers that they recommend, i had a spherical unstake itself because the chamfer was too small and didn't seat properly. We used ANC 4TG sphericals from aurora for inboard staked sphericals, the catalogue gives you all the specs you need including the staking tool.

    The other way to do it is using a bearing cup with a shoulder on the upper side and a snap ring on the bottom side, to hold the bearing in. This is heavier, but you can replace the bearings if your careful. With welding the cup to the wishbone, it would be best to do post heat treatment machining to get the tollerances correct.

    We use bearing cups on the outboard ends of the wishbone and staked bearings on the outboard ends. We stress relieve the wishbones in their jigs and then machine the bores to suit.

    Otherwise you can do what WA do on their front upper inboard wishbones and stake your bearing into the mount and use a clevice on the wishbone to pickup the bearing. This is a really nifty way of doing it.
    Monash FSAE (2005-2009)
    www.monashmotorsport.com

  6. #6
    I am a big fan of the concept of staking sphericals into small machined inboard brackets and the camber / toe bracket outboard.

    Wishbones are much simpler, just requiring simple clevices.

    Only the lower outboard joints might be better off the 'traditional' way.

    Regards, Ian

  7. #7
    If you get your tolerances right then a good press fit works as well. We staked most of our bearings but we found out that some of the ones we needed had a 6 month lead time! So we got traditional ones and considered making a staking groove in them. We ended up just tryin a press fit since the tolerances were exactly what the bearing manufacturer specified. We had no problems with slop or bearings backing out. However, it did make me a little uneasy...
    John Grego
    2008 Suspension Lead
    Texas A&M University

  8. #8
    We used tie-rod ends (not in bending) on all of the inners, except the front uppers where we used machined brackets attached to the chassis. All of the outboads were clevises, with the bearing press fit into a part of the upright. This upcoming year I think we are going to go with the chassis-mounted brakets all around, for better adjustability.

    Marketing Director
    Oxford Brookes Racing

    "Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports ... all others are games."
    - Earnest Hemingway

  9. #9
    Austin,

    Just in case the judges ask, inboard threaded rod ends are in a little bit of bending during braking and acceleration - remember the shear load input at the outboard side.

    This load is pretty small compared to the axial loading, and I neglect it during the design phase (for strength considerations anyways), but it's still there.

    Best,
    Drew
    _______________________________________

    Northwestern Formula Racing Alum
    Head Engineer, Frame/Suspension 2006-2009

    My '73 Saab 99 Road Race Build

  10. #10
    Thanks again guys.
    We'll be going for staked sphericals as well.
    We were looking into surclips but it meant the wishbone ends doubled in size. Thus more weight.
    Never even thought of staking them.

    Where did you all get your STAKING tools from? We cant find anything in OZ.

    Thanks again.
    Jon O'Neill

    Advisor-UTS Motorsports, Sydney, Australia
    www.utsmotorsports.com

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